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Salute These Shorts

8

November 19, 2012 by Thomas Pluck

I love short stories. Otherwise I wouldn’t write them, because they are a pain in the ass. Sure, you can get the whole idea in your head at once, but there’s no room for error. So when I read a great one, I sit in awe. Here are a few of my favorites. What are yours?

The Creature from the Cleveland Depths, by Fritz Leiber

This one felt silly when I first read it, but now that we have cell phones, ol’ Fritz is laughing in his grave.

In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried, by Amy Hempel

Amy Hempel paints pain so beautifully, without ever using fancy brushes.

The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas, by Ursula K. LeGuin

An incredible fable that puts civilization in perspective and asks us why we can’t walk away.

The Gentle Way, by Lawrence Block (available in his collection “Enough Rope”)

Mr. Block writes damn fine short stories. This one, about an animal shelter dealing with a vandal, resonates deeply. His excellent story “See the Woman” is available online.

Placebo, by Andrew Vachss (Available in his collection “Born Bad,” and also in Protectors: Stories to Benefit PROTECT.) You can read the also-excellent “Working Roots” free here on his website.

Placebo is a pared down work of great power. Working Roots is a gritty urban fairy tale. I wish Andrew Vachss would write a novel about these kids.

Houston, Houston Do You Read? by James Tiptree, Jr. aka Alice Sheldon.

How do you end violence? The answer is simple, if unpleasant.

Speech Sounds, by Octavia Butler
The last Ms. Butler is interviewed by Charlie Rose here:

The late, great Ms. Butler captures the terror of a true apocalypse and losing the power to communicate in this gut puncher.

The Man from the South, by Roald Dahl

One of my favorite horror tales. You’ll be clutching your fingers!

The Chaser, by John Collier

One of the funniest and best short story writers, Collier is oft forgotten but has many lessons to teach writers today and many joys to bring readers for centuries hence.

The Appointment in Samarra, by Somerset Maugham

A classic bit of flash fiction.

Why I Live at the P.O., by Eudora Welty

A great picture of a family from one of its loony members.

A Good Man is Hard to Find, by Flannery O’Connor

If you don’t like this story, hit yourself in the face.

Who Goes There? by John W. Campbell

The inspiration for “The Thing,” this one is terrifying on a cellular level.

“I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream,” by Harlan Ellison. He has written a ridiculous amount of great short stories. How to choose one? This has always been the most memorable to me. A supercomputer destroys humanity in retribution for creating him–a genius who cannot truly move, feel or love– but he saves five individuals to torture for eternity. Misanthropy at its most dire. A close second is “The Paladin of the Lost Hour,” a wonderful fantasy story about a man who guards the “clock” that keeps the world from doomsday, and how he shares a moment with a veteran wracked with survivor’s guilt. The first is available in the collection of the same name, the second is in “Angry Candy.” I am also fond of the entire collection :”Deathbird Stories,” especially the title story, which retells Genesis from Satan’s–I mean “Snake’s” point of view.

8 thoughts on “Salute These Shorts

  1. Dyer Wilk says:

    Those are some great selections, Tom. Here are a few that inspire me:

    “The Girl With the Hungry Eyes” by Fritz Leiber
    “The Man in the Underpass” by Ramsey Campbell
    “The Distributor” by Richard Matheson
    “Night Shift” by Stephen King
    “The Rifle” by Jack Ketchum
    “A Very Merry Christmas” by Ed McBain
    “Neighbors” by Raymond Carver
    “Bright Segment” by Theodore Sturgeon
    “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson
    “A Short Guide to the City” by Peter Straub
    “Of Missing Persons” by Jack Finney
    “The Scarlet Ibis” by James Hurst

  2. Les Edgerton says:

    Good choices, Tom. Agree with them all. How about a guy who in my opinion is largely and undeservedly forgotten and totally underappreciated–William Goyen? He had a voice unmatched by anyone at any time. HIs first line in his brilliant short story, “Arthur Bond” has stuck with me forever. “Remember man named Arthur Bond had a worm in his thigh.” Goyen is who I want to be when I grow up…

  3. Les Edgerton says:

    I’m also partial to him since he’s a fellow Texan… and is as good a writer as Faulkner, again, imho…

  4. Patti Abbott says:

    This is going to save me hunting around for short stories to read for a while. We have very similar tastes.

Comments are closed.

Thomas Pluck writes unflinching fiction with heart. He is the author of Blade of Dishonor, Steel Heart: 10 Tales of Crime & Suspense, and Denny the Dent. He edits anthologies to benefit PROTECT: The National Association to Protect Children, and serves as their social media editor. He hosts Noir at the Bar in Manhattan with Todd Robinson at Shade, and has been known to enjoy a pint of beer and a sloppy cheeseburger.

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