Night falls out of the gutter…

First, Ryan Sayles interviewed me for Out of the Gutter. He has a column there called The Noir Affliction. Ryan is a very funny guy, though I had to throw him around a bit, and he took a few shots at me. Probably the most entertaining interview I’ve done in a while. He asks me to define noir, and I turn into the Hulk.

Read it at The Noir Affliction.

Secondly, I’m very proud to be in Katherine Tomlinson’s NIGHTFALLS anthology, out soon from Dark Valentine Press. The last day on Earth… how would you spend it? If you’re Terence Nightingale, star of my story “Acapulcolypse,” you want to take out as many human beings as possible on your own, which is a real bother when you faint at the sight of blood. The anthology benefits Para los Niños, an organization in Los Angeles that helps at-risk kids and their parents succeed in education and in life, and contains 28 more tales from the likes of Matthew Funk, Sandra Seamans, Allan Leverone, Nigel Bird, Chris Rhatigan, Col Bury, Christopher Grant, Patricia Abbott, Jimmy Callaway and Veronica Marie-Lewis Shaw.

 

 

 

Yellow Mama and All Due Respect

When it rains, it pours.

I’m extremely proud, “chuffed,” even, to have stories in both All Due Respect – the long form crime fiction webzine started by Alec Cizak and now run by Chris Rhatigan. Chris also reviews fiction at Death by Killing, co-edits the Pulp Ink anthologies with Nigel Bird, and is a fine writer himself. Alec has moved on to Pulp Modern, and has a few novels under his belt as well.

This story is my tribute to Elmore Leonard, and was originally written for a beach noir contest at Do Some Damage. I expanded and edited it, and I love the characters so much that they will appear in a novel sometime soon. A bit of pulp caper set in Antigua, where two honeymooners need help from Hazeldeen, a barmaid at their resort, and drag her into their “White People problems.”

White People Problems, in All Due Respect

Yellow Mama, named after Alabama’s electric chair, is a crime zine edited by author Cindy Rosmus, who had a cracking tale in last month’s Hardboiled magazine. Yellow Mama caters to dark noir and horror, and my brutal revenge story shows the lengths one man will go to, to avenge his family. Sometimes revenge is a real bear.

Play Dead, in Yellow Mama

I hope you like them. If you do, please leave a comment here or at the source, and share the links with your friends. I’d really appreciate it!

Monday I’ll announce the winner of the Uncle John’s Bathroom Reader: Flush Fiction giveaway, so stay tuned. 

© 2012 Thomas Pluck
I post on Twitter as TommySalami ~ My Facebook Page

Reviews and Interviews and Upcoming pubs

Death by Killing gave Lost Children: A Charity Anthology to Benefit PROTECT and Children 1st a rave review. Chris Rhatigan runs a crime fiction blog but loved stories by crime fiction vets and literary authors equally. He chose stories by Benoit Lelievre, J.F. Juzwik, Lynn Beighley and Roberto C. Garcia as favorites and said “The collection itself lives up to its cover–these are powerful, often shocking, stories.”
Read the review here:
Death by Killing

Buy the book in all e-book formats, or trade paperback, here:
Lost Children: A Charity Anthology to Benefit PROTECT and Children 1st

It is still 99 cents on Amazon due to their price-matching. Get it while you can!

Fiona McVie interviewed me at The Inspiration Forum – thanks to Les Edgerton for suggesting me to her. If you head over there, you’ll get to read the opening of my novel BURY THE HATCHET.

I will be interviewed by Richard Godwin at Chin Wag at the Slaughterhouse next week, and I’ll share that as well. Amazingly enough, in the three interviews with me this month, we don’t cover the same material.

And here are the upcoming publications you can look for this year:

“Raker: A Review,” in Blood and Tacos
“Firecracker,” in Hardboiled Magazine (available from Gryphon Books)
“Gumbo Weather,” starring Jay Corso, in Needle: A Magazine of Noir Spring 2012 (Jay is the lead cause of mayhem in my novel Bury the Hatchet)
“Lefty,” in Crimefactory Magazine #10
“White People Problems,” in All Due Respect April 2012
“Play Dead,” in Yellow Mama, April 2012
“We’re All Guys Here,” in Dollar Dreadfuls: Dirty Noir Quarterly
“Tiger Mother,” in Noir Nation #2
“Donkey Dick,” in Big Pulp March 2013
“Six Feet Under God,” in Grift Magazine Quarterly

© 2011 Thomas Pluck

Interview and Thank Yous

First off, pulp master, wester-writin’ workhorse and all-around stand-up guy David Cranmer – editor of Beat to a Pulp and author and creator of the Cash Laramie & Gideon Miles franchise- as it is quickly becoming- invited me to answer a few questions down at the U.S. Marshal’s office. I took a shot of Maryland Rye and told him some tales… I’m no rat, but that ornery cuss is generous with his .45 Colt, and I wanted to walk out of there, so here’s the malarkey I spouted:

7 Questions, at The Education of a Pulp Writer

And I have a story up at Pulp Metal Magazine called “Gunplay.” It’s kinky and weird and I have a sick sense of humor…

I’d like to thank a few writers and bloggers for their reviews this week:

Katherine Tomlinson of Kattomic and NohoNoir, used my 100 word story “Faggot” as an example of how to write very short fiction that still tells a powerful story. “if you haven’t read it, you need to. In fewer than 100 words, he’ll take your breath away.” Thank you, Katherine… it was tough to write, and I’m glad my my punch connected!

Chris Rhatigan of Death by Killing and All Due Respect also reviewed “Faggot” on the very cool Short Story 365 project, where you read a short story every day and write a short review of it. “If you’re not reading Thomas Pluck yet, you should change that.” Thanks, Chris!

and Johnny Shaw, author of Dove Season, also chimed in at SS365 about “Little Sister” in the Lost Children Anthology, saying “If you don’t know who Thomas Pluck is, you will soon enough. His short fiction is all over the internet and he combines jabs of clever humor with full-impact gut shots.”

© 2011 Thomas Pluck

We got the Funk

Here’s what Matthew Funk has to say about my story “Junkyard Dog,” which he chose in his top 5 at Chris Rhatigan’s DEATH BY KILLING “Five You Can’t Miss” series:

“Keeping you in the action while transcending time and place, JUNKYARD DOG assembles a complete character from a scattered history of violence. The worse it gets, the more you care. And Thomas Pluck knows how to make it get real damn bad.” –Matthew C. Funk

Thank you Matt, for choosing my story and for such kind, kind words… from a writer with similar drives, to show the brutality we ignore every day, that means a hell of a lot.

© 2011 Thomas Pluck

Top Fives

I chose my top 5 stories of the year at Chris Rhatigan’s Death By Killing blog today. Drop over there and see who I chose. I know you’re waiting with bated breath. Or with baited breath, like the cat who ate the cheese. (And then cut the cheese. I had to get a fart joke in here somewhere).

I’ve been honored to be chosen by a few of my fellow writers in their top 5 stories of the year. Truly an honor and an inspiration to work even harder. Thank you all.

Nigel Bird liked “Candle” which you can read at Grift Magazine:

It’s a wonderful tale as TP keeps his foot off the gas. The events are almost incidental, but the story packed in there is huge. I really loved it.

R. Thomas Brown picked “The Forest for the Trees” which is at The Flash Fiction Offensive:

I felt for the young couple struggling to find their place, and particularly for Paulie as he fought against bigotry of many forms and handled himself with the kind of confidence and class you’d hope to see in someone. His affection feels genuine, which makes the ending hurt even more.



Sandra Seamans chose “The Uncleared” at Twist of Noir:

“You don’t expect a happy ending when you start reading this story, but the ending still slaps you in the face and leaves you reeling.”

© 2011 Thomas Pluck

Denny the Dent gets some love!

Thanks to Chris Rhatigan AND Elizabeth A. White for spectacular reviews of Pulp Modern #1. They both single out my story “Legacy of Brutality” starring Denny the Dent:

Chris at Death by Killing had this to say:

Thomas Pluck’s “Legacy of Brutality” is as devastating as the title would make it out to be. Denny is a character you can’t help but admire — through experience he’s learned that you have to defend those you love. Others may dismiss him as just a mound of muscle, but it doesn’t long for the reader to figure out he’s much more than that.

Elizabeth A. White is one of the best-known crime fiction book reviewers and she also loved Pulp Modern. She had this to say about Denny’s tale:

A few standouts…
“Legacy of Brutality” by Thomas Pluck features man-mountain Denny, previously seen in the short “Rain Dog”(Crimespree Magazine, Issue #43). Having come up hard –If there was a God, I’d beat his ass for making this hateful world. – Denny learned early it’s better to listen than talk, and that you have to set things right yourself if you want justice in this life. Brutally good stuff.

Pulp Modern has many great stories and it’s an honor to be chosen from them for singling out. Thanks, Chris and Elizabeth!

Reminder: if you buy a copy of Pulp Modern, contact me with the Kontactr form to the right and I’ll send you the first Denny story, “Rain Dog,” for free in a fancy PDF format.

http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?lt1=_blank&bc1=000000&IS2=1&bg1=FFFFFF&fc1=000000&lc1=0000FF&t=plyoto-20&o=1&p=8&l=as4&m=amazon&f=ifr&ref=ss_til&asins=1466300655

© 2011 Thomas Pluck