You can’t say no to those eyes…

I entered the foray of self-publishing this year, sort of. I published Lost Children: A Charity Anthology, edited with my friends Fiona Johnson and Ron Earl Phillips, with stories by 30 writers. And all the cash is going to two causes: PROTECT and Children 1st. One reason I did it was of course, to raise money for these organizations. Another reason was to learn the ropes and see the results, to decide if self-publishing is for me. To see what kind of sales I could generate, and how much work goes into it.

You have to set goals for yourself. My goals were:

Sell 100 copies in the first month (succeeded)
Sell at least one copy per day after that (succeeded, in the long run)

Now I wanted to sell 100 per month, but it didn’t happen. We’re at 148 sales right now, and I’d be happy to make 150 sales by the end of the year.

According to Dean Wesley Smith, these are excellent sales for a first book. The sales really pile in once you have 4-5 items for sale, because you get repeat business. I never expected this anthology, with a handful of known crime and literary writers and many first-timers, to sell very well. Fiona and I donated $600 of our own cash for the original fiction challenge, and we wanted to generate more for the causes. The project has been a great success in that regard- the royalties aren’t in yet, but we’re looking at around $350 in two months, and the book will be on sale for three years.

But let me tell you, it’s a lot of work. I’m still not sure if self-publishing is the way to go, for me. I don’t want to start that debate. It works for a lot of people. Traditional works for others. Dean Wesley Smith says use both to your advantage, and to me, that seems the wisest choice. Of course, you need to talk softly and carry a big lawyer, if you plan on self-publishing and pursuing a contract with a major publisher. Many contracts include non-compete clauses that would keep you from self-publishing, even if you’ve been doing it prior to the contract. Let the writer beware. But enough about that.

It was an exciting endeavor and now that I’ve learned it, would I do it again? You bet I would.

But I want two more sales. Really bad. The next two buyers- print or e-book- who email me the receipt (use the “contact me” form on the upper right) will get a copy of Heart Transplant by Andrew Vachss donated to the library of their choice.

http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?lt1=_blank&bc1=000000&IS2=1&bg1=FFFFFF&fc1=000000&lc1=0000FF&t=plyoto-20&o=1&p=8&l=as4&m=amazon&f=ifr&ref=ss_til&asins=1466493976http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?lt1=_blank&bc1=000000&IS2=1&bg1=FFFFFF&fc1=000000&lc1=0000FF&t=plyoto-20&o=1&p=8&l=as4&m=amazon&f=ifr&ref=ss_til&asins=B005FOFKCY

© 2011 Thomas Pluck

Heart Transplant

Heart TransplantHeart Transplant by Andrew Vachss

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Once again Andrew Vachss has broken our conception of what can be achieved with the graphic novel format. Teaming with artist Frank Caruso and clinical social worker Zak Mucha, he takes on bullying and emotional abuse with a great story that goes to the root of the problem.

As someone who was bullied in school, and who learned to fight much later in life, it touched a nerve. When we hear of bullying, we blame the bully, we blame the school, but we don’t talk of how to bully-proof our children. By teaching them that they are worth fighting for, and to have the armor of self-confidence that makes bullies seek other targets.

We can’t undo the damage that creates a bully. “Give me a child until the age of 7, and I will give you the man.” But we can raise our children to not be bullied, or tolerate the bullying of others.

I’ll be buying another copy and donating it to my local library, if they don’t already have it in stock. It’s that important.

View all my reviews

© 2010 Tommy Salami