The Protectors Anthology is coming…

For a year, I’ve been working on a follow-up anthology to Lost Children, the charity anthology inspired by Fiona Johnson‘s flash fiction challenge, hosted at Ron Earl PhillipsFlash Fiction Friday. It is nearly complete, and will be available September 1st. Here is the full list of contributors. 100% of proceeds will go to PROTECT and the National Association to Protect Children – the army fighting what Andrew Vachss calls “the only holy war worthy of the name,” the protection of children.

Protectors: Stories to Benefit PROTECT

Stories by:

Patti Abbott
Ian Ayris
Ray Banks
Nigel Bird
Michael A. Black

Tony Black
R. Thomas Brown
Ken Bruen
Bill Cameron
Jen Conley

Charles de Lint
Wayne D. Dundee
Chad Eagleton
Les Edgerton
Andrew Fader

Matthew C. Funk
Roxane Gay
Glenn G. Gray
Jane Hammons
Amber Keller

Joe R. Lansdale
Frank Larnerd
Gary Lovisi
Mike Miner
Zak Mucha

Dan O’Shea
George Pelecanos
Thomas Pluck
Richard Prosch
Keith Rawson

James Reasoner
Todd Robinson
Johnny Shaw
Gerald So
Josh Stallings

Charlie Stella
Andrew Vachss
Steve Weddle
Dave White
Chet Williamson

40 stories. One cause: PROTECT

In a few weeks, the e-book will be available across all formats. The print edition will follow.

Cover art by Kim Parkhurst. Interior design by Jaye Manus. Cover design by Sarah Bennett Pluck. Print design by Suzanne Dell’Orto. Edited by Thomas Pluck.

I would like to thank everyone who submitted stories for the collection, and everyone who assisted me with this project, and everyone at PROTECT.

Feeding Kate: Helping a Friend

My good friend Sabrina, of the crime fiction blog My Friends Call Me Kate, needs jaw surgery. She has Lupus. If you know anyone with this painful, joint-damaging disease, or if you’ve read the Dave Robicheaux novels by James Lee Burke- you know what’s she’s going through. And this gal loves her some cheeseburgers and cupcakes. Something I can appreciate.

Her insurance won’t pay for it- and instead of waiting for our country to enter the mid-20th century, we’re going to help her ourselves with an IndieGoGo campaign. Laura Benedict, Laura Curtis, Clare Toohey and Neliza Drew got us together to write stories for our cheeseburger-loving and crime fiction reading friend. The book is called FEEDING KATE, and we’ve got a hell of a line-up:

  • Ellie Anderson
  • Laura Benedict
  • Stephen Blackmoore
  • Joelle Charbonneau
  • Laura K. Curtis
  • Hilary Davidson
  • Neliza Drew
  • Chad Eagleton
  • Jenny Gardiner
  • Daryl Wood Gerber
  • Kent Gowran
  • Chris F. Holm
  • Dan O’Shea
  • Ron Earl Phillips
  • Thomas Pluck
  • Chad Rohrbacher
  • Linda Rodriguez
  • Johnny Shaw
  • Josh Stallings
  • Clare Toohey
  • Steve Weddle
  • Chuck Wendig
  • Holly West

All the proceeds will go to her surgery, and any left over will go to the American Lupus Foundation. For $5 you get a copy of the e-book, and for $18 you’ll get a print copy made through Lightning Source, by pros.

And if you like my fiction, you’ll get a Jay Desmarteaux story. He’s the lead in my novel Bury the Hatchet, a Cajun boy who likes a cheeseburger now and then himself. He’s a bully-hating bruiser who runs afoul of a biker gang in the Utah desert, who blame him for picking off their riders with his Cadillac. Their lawyer, a leather-clad lady biker named Kate, makes him a deal he can’t refuse: Take out the killer vehicle with a trunk full of nitro… if you loved “Duel” this one will be for you, and the only place to read it will be in … Feeding Kate!

Blood and Tacos!

Johnny Shaw, author of the hilarious and heartfelt fiasco DOVE SEASON, has put together a new quarterly homage to the men’s magazines and pulp novels of the ’70s. Think Remo Williams, the Destroyer. I review an awful ripoff called RAKER, and there is fiction by Matthew Funk, Cameron Ashley, Gary Phillips and Johnny himself.

Blood & Tacos #1 is a buck for Kindle, and I guarantee you will be entertained. Look at that incredible cover by Roxane Patruznick. This one will be a load of retro fun.

 http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=plyoto-20&o=1&p=8&l=as1&asins=B007EW0GHY&ref=qf_sp_asin_til&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr © 2012 Thomas Pluck I post on Twitter as TommySalami ~ My Facebook Page

Interview and Thank Yous

First off, pulp master, wester-writin’ workhorse and all-around stand-up guy David Cranmer – editor of Beat to a Pulp and author and creator of the Cash Laramie & Gideon Miles franchise- as it is quickly becoming- invited me to answer a few questions down at the U.S. Marshal’s office. I took a shot of Maryland Rye and told him some tales… I’m no rat, but that ornery cuss is generous with his .45 Colt, and I wanted to walk out of there, so here’s the malarkey I spouted:

7 Questions, at The Education of a Pulp Writer

And I have a story up at Pulp Metal Magazine called “Gunplay.” It’s kinky and weird and I have a sick sense of humor…

I’d like to thank a few writers and bloggers for their reviews this week:

Katherine Tomlinson of Kattomic and NohoNoir, used my 100 word story “Faggot” as an example of how to write very short fiction that still tells a powerful story. “if you haven’t read it, you need to. In fewer than 100 words, he’ll take your breath away.” Thank you, Katherine… it was tough to write, and I’m glad my my punch connected!

Chris Rhatigan of Death by Killing and All Due Respect also reviewed “Faggot” on the very cool Short Story 365 project, where you read a short story every day and write a short review of it. “If you’re not reading Thomas Pluck yet, you should change that.” Thanks, Chris!

and Johnny Shaw, author of Dove Season, also chimed in at SS365 about “Little Sister” in the Lost Children Anthology, saying “If you don’t know who Thomas Pluck is, you will soon enough. His short fiction is all over the internet and he combines jabs of clever humor with full-impact gut shots.”

© 2011 Thomas Pluck

Review: Dove Season

Dove Season
Dove Season by Johnny Shaw

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Subtitled “A Jimmy Veeder fiasco,” this was one entertaining read. A boy who fled farm country returns home when he learns Pop is dying, and finds his hometown barely recognizable. His father’s dying wish sets in motion a sequence of events that boot Jimmy from his extended adolescence into the tough decisions that make him a man. The story is compelling and deftly set as grim desert backdrop to a colorful crew of characters, real people who never mug for the camera. Full of belly laughs, excitement and lots of heart. Shaw paints a border town with alternating strokes of piercing honesty and bittersweet nostalgia, but like the oleander flowers that decorate each chapter, a poisonous secret lies beneath its beauty, and I enjoyed discovering it. A great debut, and to echo the blurbs- I hope there are many fiascoes to come!

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